Henry Ward Camp Monument

Henry Ward Camp

Henry Ward Camp

Henry Ward Camp (1839 – 1864)

A graduate of Yale (1860), Henry Ward Camp studied law prior to enlisting in the Hartford City Guard in April 1861. In December of that year, he was commissioned by Governor Buckingham as a 2nd Lieutenant in Company I of the 10th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in Company D of the 10th CVI and then to Adjutant of that company in 1862.

On July 19, 1863, following the Assault on Fort Wagner, Camp was captured. He managed to escape but was recaptured nearly one hundred miles away from where he had been held. Released on April 30, 1864, Camp returned to his regiment and was promoted to Major in September of that year. A month later, Camp was killed in action at Darbytown Road just outside of Richmond.

Following the battle, the enemy stripped Camp’s body, looted him for anything valuable and buried his remains. The next morning, Camp’s fellow soldiers erected a flag of truce and sent a message to the confederates asking for the remains of fallen soldier Henry Ward Camp. The request was permitted, and Camp’s remains were exhumed.

Camp’s body was accompanied home by his fellow prisoner of war and good friend Chaplain Trumbull. He was interred in Spring Grove Cemetery in north Hartford but was disinterred and reinterred at Cedar Hill Cemetery after it opened in July 1866.

His monument reads: “A true knight; not yet mature, yet matchless. Erected by his fellow citizens of Hartford as a tribute to his patriotic service, and to his noble Christian character.”

Detail of Sword, Henry Ward Camp Monument

Detail of Sword, Henry Ward Camp Monument

Detail of Eagle, Henry Ward Camp Monument

Detail of Eagle, Henry Ward Camp Monument

Recommended Conservation Treatment:

The copper alloy has light green corrosion with areas of black corrosion developing in protected areas and minor pitting. Copper runoff compounds are causing damage to the lower stone. Treatment includes washing the bronze, adding artist’s pigments as needed to even color, and applying a protective coating to inhibit future deterioration.

Conservator’s Estimate: $2,500, including all labor and materials. To complement the conservation of the bronze elements, the granite monument will be cleaned to address soiled areas. This work will be completed by Cemetery staff as an in-kind donation to Cedar Hill Cemetery Foundation.