Jewell Monument Preservation

Statue of Hope

An exceptional example of Victorian memorial art, the Statue of Hope has stood atop the Jewell Monument for over 145 years. The bronze statue, with its requisite anchor, surmounts a Corinthian column of granite.

Hope, one of the seven virtues, is most often depicted with an anchor. The anchor is a Christian emblem of hope, possibly referencing Hebrews: 6:19: “We have this hope as an anchor for the soul, firm and secure.”

The Statue of Hope is the work of Carl Conrads. Born in Germany, Conrads graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich before arriving in New York City in 1860.

After serving in the Union Army, Conrads moved to Hartford to work with James Batterson, a prominent monument dealer. Conrads, who was employed as house sculptor from 1866 to 1903, joined Batterson’s firm as it prepared for the post-Civil War demand for cemetery and other monuments.

Condition

The bronze Statue of Hope suffers from the loss of original patina and protective coatings, and active corrosion. Disfiguring corrosion includes pitting and etched drip patterns.

Although not uncommon for outdoor bronzes, these issues are visually distracting and can lead to future deterioration.

The sculpture also most likely has iron core pins and anchoring issues that need to be addressed.

Preservation

Treatment of the Statue of Hope, to begin in the summer of 2021, includes cleaning, removing loose corrosion, repairing flaws and cracks, replacing failing core pins with bronze as needed, patinating surfaces (unified aged green), and applying a protective coating followed by paste wax to reduce sheen.

Thank you to the William and Alice Mortensen Foundation, corporate sponsors, and Monument Fund donors for underwriting this project.

Corporate support includes:

Gold Sponsors

  • Mather Corporation
  • McGovern Granite Company
  • Mullaney, Keating & Wright
  • Peter M. Bakker Agency
  • Reid & Riege

Silver Sponsors

  • All Waste, Inc.
  • Close, Jensen & Miller
  • CohnReznick
  • D’Esopo Funeral Chapel
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Marshall Jewell (1825–1883)

Marshall Jewell was a successful businessman and politician. He led his family’s tanning and leather belting company, P. Jewell & Sons, to substantial wealth during the Civil War. After the war, Jewell served as Governor of Connecticut, Minister to Russia, and Postmaster General.

 

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Marshall Jewell (1825–1883)

Marshall Jewell was a successful businessman and politician. He led his family’s tanning and leather belting company, P. Jewell & Sons, to substantial wealth during the Civil War. After the war, Jewell served as Governor of Connecticut, Minister to Russia, and Postmaster General.

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Monument Fund

The Foundation raises funds to preserve Cedar Hill Cemetery’s historic memorials.
To learn more about our preservation activities visit our Monument Fund page.